Meet a Lucerna Author: Yujay Masah

Yujay will present her civil rights photography study at the Lucerna Symposium on March 11. For more about Yujay’s work, keep reading.

What is your Lucerna project about?

The title of my study is “Civil Rights Photography and Consensus Memory.” I address photography, the Civil Rights Movement, and consensus memory, which is the most common narrative of a time period, event, or movement. It is what we all learn in school and see in movies, and it is essentially the standard way of talking about a certain time period. In my paper, I look at how the photographs from the Civil Rights Movement inform this common narrative and our collective understanding of the movement. I look at the photos in detail, examining the contexts in which they appear and explain the narrative and visual stories they tell.

Why are you interested in this topic?

I’m interested in this topic because it is an intersection of my favorite subjects: historical photography and historical literacy. I think one of the most important things for people to know is how to understand and interpret our history, which comes in many formats from films and documentaries to books and exhibits. One of the most accessible and engaging ways to learn about history is through photographs. I think they capture people’s attention and imagination more than a lot of other vehicles for history, because they can be striking, beautiful, and thought provoking. I also think they are more accessible because photographs easy to find in our digital age and everyone understands (to some degree) how to look at a photo and understand the story it tells. In that sense, photographs can be excellent tools for teaching history. I also think that today, when Black people are demonstrating and fighting for equality, and that fight is more visible than ever thanks to social media, it’s important for people to know how to read the photos they are seeing and understand the stories they’re telling. I hope that when people read my essay that they can apply these same ideas to the photographs of contemporary activists that they see today.

What have been the benefits and challenges of this project?

One of the biggest benefits has been having the opportunity to connect my interests in art history and history. I am really interested in the ways that art informs how we understand history and vice versa. Some of the photographs I discussed wouldn’t be the first that come to mind when you think of photography as an art form, but all photos have a place in the history of the practice, and I was able to discuss that in this project. As for challenges, a big one was keeping this paper concise. I think I could have written another ten pages about the connection between the photographs from the Civil Rights Era and the contemporary photos we see of Black Lives Matter activists. Another challenge came from the Covid-19 pandemic and getting primary sources. I think I missed out on using two or three newspapers because of shutdowns and restrictions, but ultimately, I was still able to produce a paper that I was really proud of.

What is your advice for students who are interested in publishing their work in Lucerna?

I would say that no matter what your paper is about, if it’s one you are proud of and the subject is one you are passionate about, submit the paper. The journal covers a variety of subjects  and being passionate about the paper and the subject helps you though the editing process to keep you focused on creating a paper that is really high quality.

What are your professional plans or goals?

Right now, my plans are to go to graduate school and pursue a Master’s degree in Library Science and a Master’s degree in US history. I want to learn how to make information, especially historical information, more accessible to the public so that more people can engage with photographs, journals, newspapers, and other primary sources. I also want to study and write more about the late twentieth century in this country. I hope to be able to work in libraries and museums in the future to make history more readily available and relatable to the public and to be the person who can help guide people to the resources and materials that can help answer their questions about the past.

Jonaie Johnson Wins Student Entrepreneur of the Year Award

Honors College student Jonaie Johnson won the Student Entrepreneur of the Year Award and was recognized at the Henry W. Bloch School of Management’s 35th Annual Entrepreneur of the Year awards event in November 2020.

Jonaie is a Dean’s List business student and athlete at UMKC majoring in entrepreneurship. She started her company, Interplay, when she was accepted into the E-Scholars program. Interplay is developing an interactive, automated dog crate. Last year, Jonaie was a starter on the UMKC Roos Western Athletic Conference champion women’s basketball team.

 

 

 

National Transfer Student Week: Interview with Daisy Garcia Montoya

In honor of National Transfer Student Week, the Honors College is highlighting Daisy Garcia Montoya. Daisy discusses her journey from student at Metropolitan Community College – Penn Valley to Communications and Political Science major at UMKC, shares advice to transfer students and faculty, and delves into her goals after graduating UMKC.

Where did you transfer from?

I transferred from MCC – Penn Valley.

What brought you to UMKC?

I’m currently a Henry W. Bloch Legacy Scholar. I spent 3 semesters earning my associate degree at MCC-Penn Valley then transferred to UMKC as a Legacy Scholar. I also have lived in KC and was already excited about UMKC while being at MCC, so it all worked out perfectly.

What has your experience at UMKC been like since you transferred?

The first semester was really rough. I loved my classes and UMKC’s campus, but I didn’t know how to get involved. I came in as a spring semester transfer, so I didn’t see many inclusive activities like transfer fairs or Union Fest. It took a while to find the organizations I wanted to be involved in even though I knew that’s what I wanted to do. However, midway through my first semester, I stumbled across the Multicultural Student Affairs and their office. They sponsored and held a lot of events on campus, so I started going to those. Eventually, I also got involved with the Latinx Student Union and the Honors College. After that, I became really involved with UMKC’s community and Kansas City overall.

What advice would you give to other transfer students at UMKC?

It might seem a little rough at first, but there are so many organizations on campus to be involved with and you’re bound to find at least one you’re comfortable with. The Latinx Student Union is the organization I’m mainly involved with but I’m also a part of the College Democrats and HerCampus. COVID might make it a little difficult, but also go to virtual fairs and events because those are options as well. Look through RooGroups as well! You can see different events and organizations on campus. I did this even before I transferred to UMKC because I couldn’t wait to get involved. Instagram’s a good option too. A lot of organizations have an Instagram page. If you just type UMKC in the search bar, a lot of them will come up. You get a sense of what events they put on and what they stand for.

What advice would you give to university faculty and staff to help transfer students acclimate to UMKC?

The faculty and staff should tell the transfer students the resources that are available on campus. I feel that students don’t know about the counseling services UMKC offers, programs like the Honors College, groups like the Multicultural Student Affairs, and students that are a part of communities as a veteran or LGBTQIA+. Checking in with transfer students and asking them what they need also helps. Connecting them with their interests goes a long way. As a transfer student, you’re new to this atmosphere but sometimes you need someone to come to you first.

What do you hope to achieve both personally and professionally here at UMKC and beyond?

One of my personal goals was to be involved with the Latinx Student Union. Because this group made me feel really welcomed, my mission is to give that feeling to other students, whether they’re transfer students or freshmen and outgoing or shy. As a Communications and Political Science major, I hope to become a journalist. However, I also really love nonprofit work, so working at a nonprofit here in Kansas City that helps students or under-served communities would be how I would continue my professional career.

Any last bits of advice?

Don’t give up and keep going. UMKC is a really welcoming place with a lot of opportunities, whether it’s getting involved or getting connected with other professionals in the greater Kansas City area. You’ll meet a lot of friends and make a lot of memories.

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Meet a Lucerna Author: Grace Reeseman

What is your Lucerna project about?

My project initially was about designing and implementing a sun-tracking solar panel system. I wanted to make a solar panel system that would “follow” the sun throughout the day and therefore be at a more effective angle to collect energy. To do this, I used a light dependent resistor (LDR) and a servo motor. An LDR is a resistor that is inversely proportional to incident light intensity. The motor moved the panel from 0 to 180 degrees every 15 minutes, and voltage values were taken at each degree and stored in an array. The maximum voltage in the array, and the associated position, was found using a program in Arduino (using C++). The servo motor adjusted the solar panel to the position at which the voltage was at a maximum. As the project progressed, however, certain problems arose with saturation of the photocell. In response, I examined the effects of using a filter over the LDR in this system.

Why are you interested in this topic?

I was interested in this topic because it seemed like a simple way to increase solar panel efficiency. Renewable energy sources are underused, and I think a way to make them more appealing is to increase their efficiency.

What have been the benefits and challenges of this project?

The challenges of this project were mainly in the coding and building of the system. I had never written code in C++ before, used an Arduino, or built a circuit of this magnitude. Hence, the whole process was a learning experience for me, which I viewed as a major benefit.

What is your advice for students who are interested in publishing their work in Lucerna?

My advice for students is to get involved in doing research that you enjoy, take really good notes (even on things you are sure you’ll remember), and don’t leave all of your writing for the end.

What are your professional plans or goals?

I am currently a Mathematics and Physics double major. I am also currently enrolled in an accelerated Mathematics degree program which will allow me to obtain a master’s degree two semesters after graduating with my bachelor’s degrees. Then I plan to attend graduate school and obtain a Ph.D. in Physics. I aspire to do research in theoretical physics.

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Meet a Lucerna Author: Bwaar Omer

What is your Lucerna project about?

My project explores the effects of the German Third Reich on some of the most important composers of the time. I looked into how Adolf Hitler and his regime used these composers to further their goals. I specifically focused on Kurt Weill, Ludwig van Beethoven, Richard Wagner, Anton Bruckner, and Richard Strauss because they were the most prominent during the Third Reich. The legacies of these composers were all impacted differently and some were unscathed. There are many opinions about these composers’ standings and whether or not some of them should be shunned by the music community because of affiliation with the Third Reich.

Why are you interested in this topic?

I was initially interested in this topic due to a discussion in my European Cultures, Histories & Ideas class in which we talked about Beethoven’s contribution to the world of music. One of the professors, Dr. William Everett, asked if we knew about Beethoven’s music during the Third Reich. Then he asked why nobody seemed to be bothered that many of Beethoven’s compositions were used to empower and motivate the Third Reich. The obvious answer to this question would be that Beethoven wasn’t alive at that time, so there was no way for him to confirm or deny if he supported the beliefs of Hitler. However, this piqued my interest, because through research I was able to find that the music of some composers was treated differently after the atrocities of the Third Reich. All of this led me to research more and write a paper on the topic.

What have been the benefits and challenges of this project?

Some benefits were learning more about something I am interested in and interacting with professors from different majors. As a biology major, I don’t get many opportunities to sign up for classes that involve culture, but this project has given me the chance to delve deeper into European culture and history. Working with Dr. Everett and Dr. Scott Baker was also great because they were amazing professors and very helpful in the writing process. My biggest challenge while taking on this project was definitely the sea of opinions that I had to read through to find the facts that were necessary to write an  effective research article.

What is your advice for students who are interested in publishing their work in Lucerna?

My advice is to make sure that you find something that you are truly interested in. It is really difficult to spend time and effort on something that you won’t find intriguing in the long run. Also, I advise them to not get discouraged, because it can be hard to find information on your specific topic, but don’t stop trying.

What are your professional plans or goals?

I plan to earn my bachelor’s degree in Biology in May 2020 and hope to get my Master’s Degree in Biology by the end of next year. This summer I will be taking the MCAT and I hope to get into medical school in order to become a doctor.

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Meet a Lucerna Author: Maggie Agee

What is your Lucerna project about?

My Lucerna project is about the mental health struggles that many kids in the LGBTQIA+ community face as well as ways in which schools, parents, and peers can help. The main area of concern is the impact of ignorance and homophobia on healthy identity development and their influence on anxiety, depression, and suicidal ideation in youth. This essay examines how the lack of inclusive education and positive role models can weaken a child’s spirit, and how poor support from family and peers can lead to homelessness or conversion therapy programs that can be traumatic. In addition, I explore potential methods for mediating the stress on queer youth and promoting acceptance, such as family therapies and queer inclusive lesson plans. The goal is ultimately to educate people about a problem that typically goes under the radar and to let people in the LGBTQIA+ community know that they matter, and things can get better.

Why are you interested in this topic?

I’m interested in this topic because it is rarely spoken about, especially in academic circles. A lot of discussion of queer-related topics are restricted to adults, and they often revolve around sexual attraction or gender reassignment procedures. I noticed this when I was doing my research because there were very few scholarly articles about identity development and the effects of homophobia on children. I imagine it’s because there is a common belief that sexual orientation and gender identity are not established until one is older or that they shouldn’t be in the conversation at all because it’s supposedly inappropriate for children to talk about it. However, this is far from the truth. First of all, sexual orientation and gender identity are much more than sex itself. There are emotions and elements of expression in both gender and sexuality that are present from a young age and that shape the type of person they grow up to be. While these things are fluid and can change as one ages, I think it’s important to talk about it when people are young because in all the examples I’ve seen people went through years of confusion and fear because they didn’t know who they were or what they wanted. All they knew was that the feelings they were having were deemed wrong by society, and it caused a lot of internal torment. I think that the stigma surrounding these topics limits people from being 100% true to themselves, and it also limits our understanding of differences in human experience. For me, this project is meant to open up the conversation about such topics so that we can break this stigma and promote not only tolerance but acceptance and encouragement.

What have been the benefits and challenges of this project?

I’d say that one of the challenges was definitely finding sources related to the material I wanted to cover. I had to do a lot of digging, and there are a lot of individual stories about people who have been through tough situations, which I think both helps and hurts my argument. Emotional appeals help strengthen my point that this is a problem deserving of urgent attention, but I also understand that scholarly information and statistics is important for credibility. Balancing the two was difficult at times, but I’m happy with the result. I’d also say that it was a challenge to keep my own experiences out of the equation because it is a topic that hits close to home for me. That said, I’ve definitely benefitted from this work as well. It’s been inspiring for me because I see now that there are realistic solutions available to make life a bit easier for queer kids. I’ve also been given an opportunity to explore my own identity and experiences a little better which has made me more confident for the long run.

What is your advice for students who are interested in publishing their work in Lucerna?

My advice to anyone that is interested in potentially publishing their work in Lucerna or any publication really is to start early and give yourself time to develop your ideas. I began work on this project in Fall of 2018 in a Discourse class, and I continued to work on it under my teacher’s mentorship in Spring 2019, and on my own in Fall 2019. It has been a long journey, and I’ve made a lot of changes along the way, but I’m much happier with it than I was with my first draft. I think that the more effort you put into it, the more satisfied you feel about your work and the prouder you feel about being given an opportunity to share it. I’d also like to advise people to not hold back or be afraid to showcase bits of themselves in their work. It makes it unique, and it can strengthen the argument because it shows passion and a commitment. For me, I want people to see my commitment and passion for social justice, so that’s something I’d encourage others to do as well.

What are your professional plans or goals?

My career goals are to attend graduate school and work towards earning a PhD in clinical psychology. My current plan is to go into gerontology and work with older adults. While I am not interested in working with children, I think that the things I have discussed in this project like identity development and formation of healthy self-concepts at a young age have long-lasting effects that may be evident in some of my adult patients. I also think sexual orientation and gender identity fall into the area of intersectionality, which is crucial to consider when trying to figure out the best way to help a person. I need to be able to think about things from their point of view which means taking into account individual struggles as well as their resources for coping with those struggles.

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Shefaa Allan wins Talbott Honors College Scholarship

Science student Shefaa Allan has received the Talbott Honors College Scholarship for 2020-2021. The scholarship is named for distinguished alumna and civic leader Linda Hood Talbott and is presented annually to a full-time Honors College student who has achieved academic excellence.

Shefaa is a rising junior majoring in biology with minors in chemistry and philosophy who plans to attend medical school and become a pathologist. She led an Honors Discussion Group in Spring 2020, started a UMKC student organization advocating for justice through education, and represented Palestinians in Culture Night 2019 at UMKC.

“Shefaa truly deserves this honor!,” said Dr. Gayle Levy, Honors College Director. “She has been the Honors Discussion Group leader for Cell Biology (Bio 202) since January and it is clear how much she cares about the participants and the Honors College as a whole. She has worked hard to migrate the Cell Bio HDG online during this challenging period and to support the honors students in her group as they face all of these sudden changes together.”

Shefaa describes herself as “a girl of Palestinian origin born and raised in the Midwest” and admits that she has struggled to merge her ethnic identity with her identity as a U.S. citizen. She chose to attend UMKC, which has a large international student population, so that she could embrace both parts of her background. As she completes her second year at UMKC, Shefaa says that the university has exceeded her expectations.

Congratulations, Shefaa!

 

Lucerna Symposium 2020

More than forty students, faculty, family, and friends attended the annual Lucerna Symposium on March 5 in Pierson Auditorium at UMKC. Three of the nine undergraduates whose research articles appear in the new volume of Lucerna gave brief presentations about their remarkable scholarship and answered questions posed by the audience at the event sponsored by the Honors College.

Honors College student Sophie Jess spoke about her article, “Please Touch: An Exploration of the Bloch Building as a Post-Museum in the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.” Grace Reeseman shared highlights from her research, “Overcoming LDR Saturation in a Sun Tracking Solar Panel System.” Honors College student Chase Ford summarized his study, “The Portu-guise: Influence on the Portuguese National Identity Post-Carnation Revolution.”

Dr. Gayle Levy, the director of the Honors College, offered opening remarks and an overview of the history of Lucerna, the only peer-reviewed interdisciplinary research journal open to submissions from all UMKC undergraduates. The Honors College began publishing Lucerna in 2005 as a service to the academic community and collaborates on its design with the Egghead Student Design Agency led by UMKC Professor Paul Tosh.

“We are so lucky to be able to come together as a community every year to celebrate the publication of the exciting and creative research that UMKC students conduct. I want to thank Senior Editor Joseph Allen and Lucerna faculty advisor Dr. Henrietta Rix Wood and their team for hosting a wonderful symposium!” Dr. Levy said.

Dr. Chris Liu, vice-chancellor for research, spoke about the importance of undergraduate research. Allen and Editor-in-Chief Katelyn Fisher also addressed the audience, thanking faculty advisors who work with contributors and the Lucerna staff, and encouraging new submissions for the next volume of the journal.

The latest edition of Lucerna soon will be available in digital form on the Honors College website at honors.umkc.edu/get-involved/lucerna/.

Meet a Lucerna Author: Kelista McGraw

What is your Lucerna project about?

I wrote an essay describing the many facets of the opioid crisis. There are so many people that have been impacted by this crisis, and unfortunately the problem has been getting worse. I wrote this overview for people in different fields, because like any public health crisis, the public needs to be educated and aware of the problem and how to help. While this is an article that can be used as an introduction to learning about the opioid crisis, I do go into detail about the pharmacology of opioids to describe why and how the drugs are so addictive and harmful.

Why are you interested in this topic?

I am interested in public health, medicine, and biochemistry. I studied Biology and Chemistry at UMKC. Other than my science background, the opioid crisis is a public health nightmare and is extremely important to be familiar with it. Americans are more likely to die from an opioid overdose than a car accident. For me and many others, this topic is personal. My favorite music artist overdosed on a synthetic opioid and one of my family members had an addiction to opioids after being prescribed them after giving birth. This public health emergency is a big problem to tackle and presenting research in a way that people in all fields can appreciate can help the education effort on the topic.

What have been the benefits and challenges of this project?

The main benefit of this project was being able to communicate current research to the readers of this journal. In addition, I was given the chance to tell people a small part of my story, advocate for those going through an addiction, and encourage people to vote for elected officials who recognize this epidemic and will fund public health initiatives. I also think that I was given the opportunity to present addiction accurately, making clear that people with opioid addiction and dependence do not lack morals. The stigma against people seeking help for addiction and lack of access to receive treatment are the main reasons there are so many people who continue taking opioids until the point of overdose. The main challenge of this project was translating some dense scientific material while still being scientifically correct.

What is your advice for students who are interested in publishing their work in Lucerna?

Present your work to the staff for the next volume! Finding something you are passionate about helps keep you motivated and create your best work. Once accepted, the staff are super helpful in editing your writing to make it the best it possibly can be. If you are interested in doing this, I highly recommend it!

What are your professional plans or goals?

Currently, I am preparing to apply for Physician Assistant school in April. A PA is an advanced practice provider (APP) that helps improve patient outcomes, expand access to primary care medicine, and work alongside other APPs. PA school is a two-year master’s program, and I am applying all over the United States (including UMKC!). I am excited to further my education and work in a medically underserved area in the future.

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The Lucerna Symposium, at 5 p.m., Thursday, March 5, will feature most of the contributors to the latest edition of the undergraduate journal. This event is free and open to the public. Click here to RSVP.

 

 

Meet a Lucerna Author: Olivia Steely

What is your Lucerna project about?

My project studied the powerful rhetoric of St. Louis native Dorothy Roudebush. I was enamored with her ability to take a difficult topic of abortion, one that was clearly dear to her, and express her opinions in a way that was empathetic and nuanced. I chose her speech at the Manchester Christian Church because she was addressing an audience that, as a whole, had different opinions on the topic than Dorothy. In a time where the cultural conversation seems polarized and loud, Dorothy’s speech is an example of how individuals, especially those who would like to see positive change in their community, can engage in conversations about difficult topics such as abortion. I argued that Dorothy used empathetic rhetoric to find common ground and understanding from both sides in such a personal argument.

Why are you interested in this topic?

I find controversial and sticky topics to be the most fascinating. I love topics that include lots of nuance and layers and, while often overlooked, these layers are valuable and relevant to the conversation. I like to educate myself and others who love to study people who are passionate about a topic and express that passion powerfully and elegantly.

What have been the benefits and challenges of this project?

One of the challenges of this project was putting my emotional reactions aside when analyzing her documents. Since I enjoy studying and writing about topics that I am passionate about, I expected some of my own reactions to the subject. Another challenge was taming my curiosity. I spent lots of time in the archives on the UMKC campus studying Dorothy’s documents and artifacts. I had to make sure that I stayed focused on my argument, but also allow myself some time to explore and learn about Dorothy’s work in a more informal manner. I had lots of benefits from this project. I learned that I loved looking at manuscripts in archives and to not be afraid to research in ways I was not familiar with. I also gained fulfillment from learning about an individual from my local community who did such interesting and difficult work.

What is your advice for students who are interested in publishing their work in Lucerna?

My advice would be to find a project or work that you are very passionate about. Then, you just have to submit it and get it over with! If you are passionate about the work you want to publish, then you are proud regardless if you are accepted or not.

What are your professional plans or goals?

My current professional plans are to graduate with a bachelor’s degree in secondary education (English emphasis) and a Spanish minor from the University of Missouri-Saint Louis. I then plan to complete a master’s degree in educational administration. I would like to continue research and write about little known individuals who enacted change in their communities, as well as work in creating a more inclusive and modern educational system.

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The Lucerna Symposium, at 5 p.m., Thursday, March 5, will feature most of the contributors to the latest edition of the undergraduate journal. This event is free and open to the public. Click here to RSVP.