Course Descriptions

Spring 2021 Honors Courses

 

Biology H206: Honors Genetics

Drs. Saul Honigberg and Scott Hawley, Online Synchronous: MWF 8:00-8:50am

Pathway Class Code: 12988

A modern approach integrating molecular and organismal studies of the general genetics of lower and higher organisms. Chromosomal structure and function, gene transmission, heredity, plasticity, and population genetics will be discussed. Prerequisites: BIOLOGY 108, BIOLOGY 109, CHEM 212R. The course offers in-class discussion to dig deeper into topics like the societal issues of genetics. This course offers a limited number of seats, taught by active geneticists, including Dr. Hawley, an investigator at Stowers Institute, and is considered an important class for students interested in research.

Biology H385 and 385: Special Topics

Dr. Jess Magaña, Online Asynchronous

Pathway Class Code: 14175 (for section H385) ; 14132 (for section 385)

Invasive species are of concern to the public, scientists, and governments as invasive species can negatively impact native ecosystems, economies, and human health. Students in this 3-credit-hour, online course will study the biological traits that contribute to successful invasions, the ecological and economic impacts of invasive species, and the legal and cultural responses to invasions. Students will develop critical analysis and communication skills by analyzing scientific literature, discussing implications, and presenting arguments in written and oral platforms.

This is not an honors-only seminar. Students who wish to earn honors credit for this class will give a 10-minute presentation from the point of view of a shareholder dealing with an invasive species. Recorded presentations will be followed by an online, asynchronous discussion in which presenters will answer questions “in-character.

Biology H498WI and 498WI: Critical Analysis of Biological Issues

Dr. Jess Magaña, Online Asynchronous

Pathway Class Code: 14193 (for section H498WI) ; 14242 (for section 498WI)

Why do animals do what they do, and how do we know? This three-credit-hour course explores evolutionary influences on animal behavior and the challenges associated with developing and testing hypotheses. Students will develop critical analysis skills and effective written and oral communication skills by analyzing scientific articles, discussing methodology and implications, writing analytical papers, and communicating through oral presentations.

This is not an honors-only seminar. Students wishing to earn honors credit for this class will create an additional project that explores scientific writing as a discipline.

Communication Studies H110: Fundamentals Of Effective Speaking And Listening

Dr. Steven Melling, Hybrid, Tu/Th 11:30am-12:45pm

Pathway Class Code: 16702

An introduction to the dimensions of effective platform speaking with special emphasis on developing critical listening and successful public speaking skills. In this honors-only section, students will compose a research-based asynchronous presentation—a video essay.

Critical Thinking-Arts and Humanities (GECRT-AH) H106: Kansas City as Text

Dr. Henrietta Rix Wood, Tu/Th 4-5:15pm

Pathway Class Code: 17106

In this class, you will investigate important local topics, problems, or issues. For example, you might explore how the city can preserve the cultural and historical value of the 18th and Vine District while responsibly revitalizing that area. Or you could consider how First Friday, the monthly public gathering in the Kansas City Crossroads, should be altered to better serve the needs and interests of artists, merchants, and guests. To pursue these projects, you will conduct research using methods appropriate to the humanities, such as observation, archival research, and expert interviews; articulate relevant research questions; take a position on your topic and produce a text that meets the expectations of the humanities. You will finally share your findings in a class presentation.

Critical Thinking-Social Sciences (GECRT-SS) H102: Culture Through the Camera Lens

Dr. Stephen Christ, Tu/Th 10-11:15am

Pathway Class Code: 17182

This course provides an introductory survey of documentary film making as a distinct form of social research that has the ability to reflect, critique, reshape, and impact society and culture. In the first half of the course we will consider how documentaries critically examine various aspects of society and culture (violence, race, class, gender and sexuality, environmentalism, etc.). In the second half of the course students will collaborate to produce their own multimedia project on some aspect of human behavior in one particular group/community—their history, culture, and experiences.

English H225: Intermediate Academic Prose

Dr. Henrietta Rix Wood, Tu/Th 1-2:15pm

Pathway Class Code: 17078

This course extends the work of English 110 with an additional emphasis on research. This honors section of English 225 uses a combination of book-length and shorter texts to focus on specific historical and/or cultural issues. As they learn to participate in scholarly conversations, students will find and evaluate library and Internet sources. As with English 110, this course emphasizes revision, editing, and proper academic documentation.

Honors 330: Senior Thesis/Project Practicum

Dr. Stephen Christ, Online Synchronous: day and time TBD

Pathway Class Code: 13741

This graded, one-credit course will prepare honors students to undertake a Senior Honors Thesis or Project. In this class, students will explore different options for theses or projects; identify a topic and faculty advisor; plan the production of the thesis or project; produce a component of the thesis or project; and collaborate effectively with other honors students to develop their plans.

Honors 496 and Honors 496A: Honors Internship

Dean McKusick, section 0001, and Jessica Elam, section 0002

Pathway Class Code: 13739 (for section 0001 of 496) ; 14266 (for section 0002 of 496) ; 14029 (for section 0001 of 496A) ; 14267 (for section 0002 of 496A)

This course is an academic internship that requires written assignments in addition to the work performed in a professional workplace. Internships are individually arranged with the sponsoring organization, which may be a business, school, nonprofit agency or government office. Academic credit may range from 1 to 6 credit hours (0 credit hours for Honors 496A). There will be a Learning Agreement established in the first week of the semester that states the contractual responsibilities of the student, the workplace supervisor, and the internship coordinator. This Learning Agreement will outline the job responsibilities, workload expectations, assignments and anticipated learning outcomes of the internship experience.

Honors 499: Senior Thesis/Project Writing Group

Dr. Henrietta Rix Wood, Online Syncronous: day and time TBD

Pathway Class Code: 13740

This one-hour credit, graded course is open to honors students and high-achieving students who are working on senior theses, projects, or capstone papers. The group meets twice a month to offer peer response to the work of members who set goals and deadlines for producing their theses or projects.

Sociology H320 and 320: Social Deviance

Dr. Stephen Christ, Online Asynchronous

Pathway Class Code: 16632 (for section H320) ; 16631 (for section 320)

An introduction to the study of deviant behaviors. We will examine the ways in which deviance is constructed and defined. Major sociological perspectives and theories will be applied to understand how they aid in the formation and development of social deviance. In addition, various forms of deviant behaviors will be discussed, including: drug use, sexual deviance, violence, suicide, LGBT issues, inequality and crime.

This is not an honors-only seminar. In order to earn honors credit, students will complete additional work for the course, which could include, but is not limited to, a collaborative learning experience, an additional individual research paper, an applied learning project, or an artistic project. Students are invited to meet with Dr. Christ at the start of the semester to develop a plan.

Courses vary by semester. Check the university catalog or Pathway for courses offered, and remember you can always contract for honors credit.

Fall 2020 Honors Courses

 

Anchor H399 and Anchor 399: Social Action

Drs. Henrietta Rix Wood and Stephen Christ, TR 4:00-5:15pm

Students will explore the role of socially responsible citizens and leaders in a democratic society and contribute towards the betterment of the community. More specifically, this course will introduce students to concepts and strategies that will enable them to collaborate with classmates to analyze a social problem, develop a solution to that problem, and implement the solution.

This course is not an honors seminar. Students enrolled in Anch H399 will do a group project in consultation with the instructors.

Bio H498WI and 498WI: Critical Analysis of Biological Issues

Dr. Jess Magaña, Online Asynchronous

Reading and analysis of scientific literature, including original papers, on a topic of broad biological interest. Critical discussion of experimental methods and results. Writing of scientific reviews and a term paper. Taking the MFAT test is a requirement of this course, and the course satisfies the general education synthesis requirement. Prerequisites: RooWriter. Co-requisites: Biology 441.

Honors component for BIO H498WI: This is not an honors-only seminar. In order to earn honors credit, students need to complete additional work for the course at the honors level. Students who wish to earn honors credit for this class will write a research proposal addressing a need for specific knowledge related to behavior.

DISC H300: Discourse III: Civic and Community Engagement (Speech and Writing)

Dr. Henrietta Rix Wood, MW 4:00-5:15pm

Students will put the knowledge and skills learned in Discourse I and II into practical use by engaging in a service-learning project that is interdisciplinary and intercultural. Students will use strategies of critical discourse analysis and critical language awareness to target the appropriate audience/recipients for their service project, to develop innovative and rhetorically effective texts, and to reflect on their project’s purpose, methods, and consequences.

English H225: Intermediate Academic Prose

Dr. Henrietta Rix Wood, TR 1-2:15pm

This course extends the work of ENGLISH 110 with an additional emphasis on research. This honors section of ENGLISH 225 uses a combination of book-length and shorter texts on focus on specific historical and/or cultural issues. As they learn to participate in scholarly conversations, students will find and evaluate library and internet sources. As with ENGLISH 110, this course emphasizes revision, editing, and proper academic documentation.

GECRT-AH H101: Critical Thinking-Arts and Humanities: Making Meaning in A Changing World

Drs. Gayle Levy and Drew Bergerson (History), Tuesday 10:00-11:15am, Online Synchronous

In this three-credit, general education course, students will study the arts and humanities: the processes and resulting cultural-historical artifacts, drawn from the past and/or present (artistic, cinematographic, literary, architectural, philosophical, musical, kinetic, theatrical, historical texts) that help us make sense of our pasts, our lives, our world and show us what it means to be human. Course Topic: The Holocaust.

This course is not an honors seminar. Students enrolled in GECRT-AH101 will do a group project in consultation with the instructors.

GECRT-SS H101: Critical Thinking-Social Sciences: Why Though?

Dr. Stephen Christ, TR 10:00-11:15am

What is human behavior? How do humans influence and are influenced by the world around them? How can we study behavior in a meaningful way given just how complex humans and societies are? In this three-credit, general education course, students use perspectives and frameworks from the social sciences to identify and explore relevant questions. In particular, students will collect and evaluate evidence from which conclusions about the human experience or behavior can be drawn. In this honors section of the course, we will focus on how social scientists study social justice. We will primarily focus on how researchers in the field of sociology approach this study. However, assignments and course activities will also introduce how researchers in other fields (such as political science, geography, women’s and gender studies, etc.) approach this same phenomenon.

Honors 230: Honors American Government

Dr. Debra Leiter, Hybrid:  Monday or Wednesday 11-11:50am and Friday 11-11:50am online synchronous

In this course we will examine the structure and operation of American government, issues in American politics, and scholarly explanations for the patterns that we observe. We will discuss characteristics of the American Constitution, federal and state institutions, and the challenges of maintaining an effective democratic government. In addition to political institutions, we will also consider citizen participation, the role of the media, the emergence of the perpetual campaign, and the prospects for effective policy solutions to problems in modern America. Students will have opportunities to hone their analytical and communication skills, and to develop their own views about American politics.

Honors 496 and Honors 496A: Honors Internship

Dean McKusick, section 0001, and Jessica Elam, section 0002

This course is an academic internship that requires written assignments in addition to the work performed in a professional workplace. Internships are individually arranged with the sponsoring organization, which may be a business, school, nonprofit agency or government office. Academic credit may range from 1 to 6 credit hours (0 credit hours for Honors 496A). There will be a Learning Agreement established in the first week of the semester that states the contractual responsibilities of the student, the workplace supervisor, and the internship coordinator. This Learning Agreement will outline the job responsibilities, workload expectations, assignments and anticipated learning outcomes of the internship experience.

Sociology 101: Sociology: An Introduction

Dr. Stephen Christ, TR 2:30-3:45pm

An introduction to the study of society and the basic concepts of sociology.

This course is not an honors seminar. Students who wish to earn honors credit for it will do an honors contract or project in consultation with the instructor.

Courses vary by semester. Check the university catalog or Pathway for courses offered, and remember you can always contract for honors credit.